Thursday, July 15, 2010

Unsuccessful but Necessary

Well, I unloaded my work from the kiln on Monday. As usual, it takes me a few days to look at and process the work.
As soon as the work was cool, I eagerly rushed off to Lowe's to get the necessary hardware for assembly. Back in the studio, I quickly started to thread the bolts, washers and nuts into place. It didn't take long for me to realize that I was up against some serious technical difficulties! Ugh!
I had anticipated being able to tighten the hardware enough so that the pieces would stay snugly in place. This, unfortunately was not the case in 2 out of 3 new works. Even with rubber washer to help absorb the force, the ceramic pieces wanted to spin about in all directions. Great if I was making a windmill, but not so much for a stationary hybrid-flower-type form.
Though I am disappointed with the outcome of this work, I still feel it was a HUGE learning experience. And I've been able to go through that learning curve much quicker because of the focus I'm able to get during this residence.
I am reminded of a quote from the book Art and Fear - "Even the failed pieces are essential."
So, with that in mind, I'm off to the studio to make and learn more!

Cheers!
Meagan

8 comments:

Linda Starr said...

Sorry about the spinning, wonder if it is the angle the pieces are constructed - the washer is snug against part of the connection but not the other, thanks so much for posting. Looking forward to more of your progress, nothing ventured nothing gained, seems ceramics has a lot of venturing.

ang said...

bummer! oh well you will take away something from this residency even if you don't know what it is yet...

Meagan Chaney said...

Thank you Linda, Ang and everyone who emailed or posted on facebook suggestions for my technical delimma. I've got tons of ideas how to tackle it now!

Linda Starr said...

Meagan, I had another idea about the connections, if you know a long time jeweler, one who makes jewelery in metal and precious stones, they have great ideas on how to get metal to work with other materials.

Desert Rubble said...

That's too bad! I always have the same mindset when something doesn't work out.....if I learned something to help in a future project, it was not a failure. They do look great BTW!

Lynn

John Britt said...

Meagan,

You can see why Michael Sherrill uses welded stems and glue.

http://web.mac.com/michaelsherrill/michaelsherrill/Portfolio.html

Meagan Chaney said...

Seriously! Glad I'm taking his class at Penland in September. Hopefully I can learn some tricks!

John Britt said...

OH! Fantastic. He is the man.